JOHN WYNNE

(B. 1957, Zweibrüken, Germany)

 

John Wynne’s award-winning, often research-led work is made for museums, galleries, public spaces and radio: it ranges from large-scale installations to delicate sculptural works and from architectural sound drawings to flying radios and composed documentaries that explore the boundaries between documentary and abstraction. He has worked with speakers of endangered languages in Botswana and British Columbia and with heart and lung transplant patients in the UK. He is a Reader in Sound Arts at the University of the Arts London, a core member of the CRiSAP research centre and has a PhD from Goldsmiths College, University of London. Wynne lives and works in London.

 

His award-winning work, which is often research-led, is made for museums, galleries, and public spaces, as well as for radio – ranging from massive installations to delicate sculptural works and from architectural sound drawings to flying radios.  Long-term research projects have included working with speakers of endangered languages of Africa and Canada and with heart and lung transplant patients in the UK.   For three years, he had his own programme called Upcountry on ResonanceFM in London, where according to Ed Baxter, Wynne “invited Tammy Wynette [American country music singer] to have tea with Pierre Henry [French composer, most famous for being a pioneer of musique concrete genre of electronic music] – in a thunderstorm”.